"An investment in knowledge pays the best interest"

Published by the Editor at 2.35pm on Wednesday, 4 September 2013.

By Harun Momanyi. Harun is studying for a BSc in Tourism Management at Kenyatta University. He lives in Nairobi, Kenya and is passionate about films. Please read his article and leave your thoughts and comments below. *Shortlisted for the NUHA Adult Blogging Prize 2013* 

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I support the funding of higher education despite the tight finances because there are countless reasons why we should support education. Educating our youth is more worthy than other forms of investment. This is because of an obvious reason: they are our future. They are the ones to take care of us in our old age. They are the ones to herald technological development as well as finish what we started.

What they have said and done about it: essence

There are financial strains here and there but as Apple's Senior Vice President Philip Schiller puts is, "Education is in Apple's DNA." we have to seek such inspiration from world leaders in educational technology and related multidisciplinary fields for the best of our future.

When US President visited the African continent, one of the priorities was to power the continent through $7 billion initiative. Through access to electricity, more students will get access to facilities that rely on electricity especially computers which are indispensable in facilitating learning.

The government of South Korea plans to digitize the high school curriculum by 2015. I must admit that the devices required to read eBooks will be costly in terms of the units to be bought. But it's worth it right? Taking into account the fact that the traditional books are bulky and when torn its rather difficult costly to keep them in shape. Rather the only annual cost for eBooks is updating them.

"Eragon looked back at him, confused, ‘I don't understand.'

‘Of course you don't,' said Brom impatiently. ‘That's why I'm teaching you and not the other way round.'" This is a literary snippet form Christopher Paolini's book made into a 2006 fantasy adventure-film ‘Eragon' by the same title. He started reading (fantasy) books at the age of 10 and writing at age 15. Educating himself lead to his widely-acclaimed success.

Where the problem is:

American Billionaires are currently dumping their shares in the US market citing the problem as the fact that the latter isn't performing as expected. Apparently this may ricochet to the education funding industry due to the interconnection of fiscal institutions.

The things that directly affect or are affected by funding of undergraduate education include funding of mortgage and unemployment which leads to a log in the repayment process in the educational loans. The most tangible thing to do is to educate the youth on how to create jobs in this digital era. The quotations provided further show how the funding of high school education has been affected by either ignorance or breaching of fiscal management norms.

"In 2002, the Detroit Public Schools had a $103.6 million surplus. Now the district faces a deficit of $259 million and is contemplating filing for bankruptcy protection, a rare occurrence in the history of American public education... The FBI has targeted a school district payroll manager for allegedly embezzling $400,000." Educationext.org -The Phony Funding Crisis.

"In fall 2003, it is estimated that at least 250,000 prospective students were shut out of higher education due to rising tuition or cutbacks in admissions and course offerings."

"A university president has warned that any more delays in solving the funding crisis in higher education will damage thousands of students." -Irish Examiner

On to funding education, a study shows that there are obvious deficits in funding campus education. For instance, at the University of California there is a myth that the varsity doesn't really have a budget problem because it has so many different funding sources it can dip into. Yes it is true, but the strain, from my view, comes from the fact that many students are training for courses that are not so demanded for in the job market.

This translates to underemployment especially in STEM-related jobs. Unemployment leads to delayed repayment of the educational loans and the mortgage industry suffers too.

The way to go: filling the gaps of education and manpower, through right career choices and investments.

Apparently my country is not an exemption since I had to go through an endless chain of scholarship applications, begging prospective sponsors who eluded me with twinning explanations, varsity admission orientations that were not fruitful...so I decided to work for my education.

It would be wise for the high school curriculum to engage students in discussions on the importance to know what tuition fee, loan, maintenance grant, university bursaries and scholarships, course grant and fee grant benefits are and the statistics on the current strain on educational resources so that they can make informed career decisions. However we cannot be reluctant to fund education since it is the pillar for tomorrow's generation's survival.

"Digital jobs are created through the application of information and communications technologies (ICT) to a new or existing activity or process. Digital jobs generally include performing information-based tasks that build the individual's capacity for future work."-Rockefeller Foundation which is to pump $97 in creating digital jobs in Africa. Judith Rodin, President of the Rockefeller Foundation, made the announcement on at the World Economic Forum on Africa in Cape Town, South Africa earlier this year in June. I am dedicating this to STEM for helping me benefit directly from the above.

The same way a photographer tracks an athlete and the background blurs or takes photographs of the monuments at Utah and spends the night getting the best shots of the night sky. It is a serious thing that we should sponsor education even though there are other problems to deal with. Education will then help us solve these problems. A pragmatic way of approaching the future it is.

Education is so important because it develops a generation of responsible individuals who understand the forms of proper conduct. It also helps a person define their career objectives that will help them build a skill set. It is the best for our generation. Some of the major reasons may be that we may prioritize other areas of operations like scientific research in archaeology, emerging technologies as well as exploring the dead worlds...but it won't be sensible to try reach for the top of the pyramid when we haven't worked on the foundation.

"If you have a daughter, she should go be an engineer." Says Meg Whitman, the President and CEO, Hewlett-Packard. She is genuinely concerned about the importance of education despite the fact that funding isn't easy. We can always find our way forward. You really wouldn't how strong you can be until the only option you have left is to be strong. IBM (Ignite Camps), Microsoft Youth Spark, HP Catalyst, Boeing STEM summer camps in conjunction with the US NAVY, IMAX community education among others are really supporting education in their respective capacities and collaborations.

The strength lies not in your investment but the power of your dreams. In my country, there is a man called Kinuthia. According to Forbes, Kinuthia has a remarkable story. In 1995, he started off manufacturing shampoos and conditioners from a makeshift apartment in Nairobi with start-up capital of Ksh. 3,000 ($40). He made these products manually using plastic drums and a huge mixing stick and heating oils, delivering his products by handcart to local salons and hairdressers. In the beginning, commercial banks refused to fund his venture while mainstream salons, beauty parlors and large retail outlets refused to stock his product because it was too native. Would you believe that he became the owner of Interconsumer Products known for Nice&Lovely, Clarion, Queen Elizabeth and others? L'Oreal Paris opened a regional office for East Africa in 2011...and having faced stiff competition went on to buy I.P for a cool Ksh. 3 billion, but Kinuthia still runs part of the business. This is the art of not dismissing the smallest dreams in our undergraduate students. The same dream applies to "Avatar" film maker James Cameron, who waited 13 years to make the story a real reel.

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Explore the other blogging prize entries | Find out more about the Blogging Prizes   

 


Comments

Posted by Tom Mutuku at 3.32pm on Wednesday, 4 September 2013.

An amazing read. Sure knowledge supporting is the best way to go!

Posted by Patricia Njenga at 7.13pm on Wednesday, 4 September 2013.

It's a well researched article,Harun is an inspirational writer
Making this an informative and amazing read

Posted by at 8.19pm on Wednesday, 4 September 2013.

good stuff :-)

Posted by Gordon Ssendiwala at 8.33pm on Wednesday, 4 September 2013.

your right, education needs to be embraced in this ever competitive world today. I think the main issue here is what kind of education is needed to address the real issues the world is facing, I mean, how many graduates do we have today who can not put food on their own table?
Another issue is the affordability of higher education, look at how many Americans are in debt for most of their lives because of school loans tey had to take? im sure if the education they took the loan for REALLY helped them then they'd have enough to break out of debt.
I think investing in an education that will have direct and immediate impact to the world is what is most needed today.

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 12.08am on Thursday, 5 September 2013.

-Tom Mutuku, thank you so much I am glad you liked the article I hope you learnt a lot from it.

-Patricia, Thank you too. I did consult several resources. I considered an approach used by Intel Corporation's Chief Futurist Brian David Johnson. He goes around the globe attending conferences, talking to families and studying their lifestyles, works with singers, farmers, industrialists, teachers, engaging with children, technopreneurs and many other people from all walks of life so as to harness all the information into an accurate projection of what we need in the future (as early as 2020) as far as technological advancement is concerned.

-Gordon, I couldn't agree more with you. It is a competitive world for real. Everybody wants to be the best at any given moment. That is why a certain red-carpet reporter went to a movie premiere targeting to interview Johnny Depp but when Justin Bieber surfaced out of nowhere, she changed her mind promptly and interviewed Justin instead. The trick turned outrageously successful. Another better example is when Microsoft's CEO threw a chair across the room because and engineer had talked about 'working with Google.' It is funny how competition makes people passionate right? But for a good course! On that note, we need to be aware of the dynamics in the educational sector and the employer's realm too. We do not want a 'naive', poorly educated next generation and that is that cannot handle the contemporary issues that will have morphed into more complex ones. That is why I support the financing of higher learning despite the tough fiscal times.

Posted by brenda mong'are at 5.04am on Thursday, 5 September 2013.

nice article.

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 9.12am on Thursday, 5 September 2013.

Thank you Brenda :)

Posted by Keziah Waiganjo at 10.06am on Thursday, 5 September 2013.

Very nice article, education is the key to making it in life. The results may not be immediate, but it pays off.

Posted by mourad oumahdi at 1.36pm on Thursday, 5 September 2013.

good read Harun and great subject. Education is the way to move us humanity forward!

Posted by sri purna widari at 6.17pm on Thursday, 5 September 2013.

I have been following Harun's career path for a while now and I am very proud of his hard work to mark the importance of education and he is the living proof of an educated man who uses his knowledge for the betterment of society.

His research and how he explained about how education is the best investment should be disseminated worldwide especially to third world and developing countries in order to motivate parents to think better for their children in this tough and competitive world we are in.

I am proud of Harun's hard works and his persistence to be where he is now.


Posted by sri purna widari at 6.47pm on Thursday, 5 September 2013.

And Harun, what I would like all of us to remember is that, education is not always a guarantee that a person will use his intelligence and knowledge for goods because there are proofs of educated people who turn into evils to be very blunt.

Parents must make sure that they invest their times and money for the education that will bring the kids not only to be an intellectual but also spiritual in a way that they will use their knowledge for helping those in needs and the betterment of society.

Posted by Kibet at 9.37am on Friday, 6 September 2013.

What a nice article!

Posted by Michael Mbote at 9.44am on Friday, 6 September 2013.

Good read Harun, very well articulated and researched. It highlights very pertinent issues that we should all be thinking about. Well done.

Posted by Peter at 9.59am on Friday, 6 September 2013.

Great article, is there a place where one can go to be educated on what opportunities are available for poor but clever students ?

Posted by Joab Khamala at 10.14am on Friday, 6 September 2013.

Good article Harun, an Investment in knowledge is the best investment an individual would have.

Posted by Spencer Owuor at 1.28pm on Friday, 6 September 2013.

A good read.

Posted by By Appointmnet Africa at 1.38pm on Friday, 6 September 2013.

Fantastic article Harun. Very informative and well researched.

Posted by Maureen Wanjiku at 3.50pm on Friday, 6 September 2013.

A very good read.
Been following up with your career and articles.
Brilliant Individual

Posted by Cynthia Meru at 6.10am on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

It a great article on education continue to do what you do best

Posted by Hemal Shah at 9.23am on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

Very well written, Harun. Education is the key to our growth in Africa and we should prioritize investment into it by all means. Kenya is speculated to have 3 times its current GDP in the next 12 years. This will be brought about by a higher educated workforce.

Posted by Simon Waitara at 2.31pm on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

Unique approach to educative prose!

Posted by Benard Kiprono at 4.29pm on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

Education is the best provision for the old age,good idea.

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 4.42pm on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

Thanks a lot Bernard

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 4.44pm on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

-Keziah, Thanks a lot. Continue doing the good work, connecting students to world's best education at Preparation For Life-Kenya

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 4.44pm on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

-Mourad, Thank you too for being an amazing mentor and helping students from all over the world chose the best career choices in the Intertainment Industry as seen on your grad stories from Full Sail University!
http://www.fullsail.edu/grads

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 4.45pm on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

-Mourad, Thank you too for being an amazing mentor and helping students from all over the world chose the best career choices in the Intertainment Industry as seen on your grad stories from Full Sail University!
www.fullsail.edu/grads

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 4.52pm on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

-Spencer, Thank you for your reading!

-Appointment Africa, Thank you for your valuable feedback. I am glad you learnt from it.

-Maureen Wanjiku, Thanks much for the continued support, I couldn't ask for more. With love and support from family, friends and other people from various scopes, even the incredible can be achieved.

-Cynthia, I appreciate a lot. STEM education is my passion and I promise to herald its importance in a life-long endeavor :)

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 4.53pm on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

-Shah, that is really great. The future is created, it is not a destination. I really feel the same, because as we advance technologically and we try our best to be economically stable, the people with relevant skills and qualifications are really needed. For example, the latest NASA achievement, as quoted by New Scientist Magazine, "The man in the moon is about to get his own version of a broadband connection, as well as a visit from China. NASA's LADEE moon orbiter, due to launch on 7 September, will use laser pulses to exchange high-capacity signals with Earth." was done by sheer investment on research and technology which is basically investment in knowledge.
PS: Artist Lil Wayne recently at the Katie Couric show in NYC said that education is important and that is why he wants his kids to finish school.

www.youngmoney.com/posts/youngmoney/60499457037/lil-wayne-and-katie-couric-talk-about-highschool#.UisxHsZ_PER

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 4.58pm on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

-Kibet, Thank you so much for taking your time to read the piece, I appreciate.

-Michael, Thank you for contributing. These are issues we cannot be silent about.

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 5.00pm on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

-Peter, Thank you for your comment and question.

“Formal education makes you a living, self-education makes you a legend.”
-Habeeb Akande, author

You could start by building passion in you by doing research, engaging in youth activities and forums (like recently there was the 'Value Based Leadership Forum at Kenyatta University in conjunction with Equity Bank and Master Card Foundation among other sponsors.
For a corporate, I know of Technobrain Group, check them out here: www.goo.gl/uzpYHy They offer the kind of training you are asking for. For talent, I suggest Usher's New Look Foundation that nurtures talent and education, you can get more information here:

www.ushersnewlook.org/programs/new-looks-leadership-certification

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 5.04pm on Saturday, 7 September 2013.

-Purna, Thank you for your amazing insight and priceless support. I totally agree with you that educating our people is the best way to a better society. However I am aware that our parents have failed especially in educating us about sexual health. A couple weeks back I was on my way to school and heard a chocking conversation on our famous local Classic 105 radio station. Teenagers were confessing their activity in uncontrolled, irresponsible sexual behavior. They blamed their parents for bluntly refusing to talk to them on sexual matters. Parents in turn blamed the teenagers for being arrogant. A man said that his younger sister aged 17 was expectant despite warnings. A BBC report available at www.goo.gl/jJ8Vhj shows that there is rampant teenage pregnancy in South Africa. To curb all this, we need to make parents aware of places (organizations and resources) that can educate them on the need for taking education of any form seriously. There is a notion African parents do not know how to 'show love' but they really care. Purna, I know that at your island Bali, Indonesia there is a tendency of women being looked down upon and never given a leadership chance and the same approach can be used. Some platforms include:

- www.ippfar.org/en/ (International Planned Parenthood Federation)
- www.idebate.org/ (International Debate Education Association)
- www.iggy.net/ (IGGY) in conjunction with Litro Magazine UK and University of Warwick)
- www.ideas.itu.int/ (International Telecommunication Union's Crowdsourcing Platform)

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 2.08pm on Sunday, 8 September 2013.

-Best SEO Service, you are welcome and thank you for taking your time to go through the piece.

Posted by Wanjohi at 4.07pm on Sunday, 8 September 2013.

Good stuff. Thank you

Posted by Mercy Muhia at 10.52am on Monday, 9 September 2013.

That's a nice one and not only does it touch on the problem but the benefit of the solutions too.

Posted by george at 11.50am on Monday, 9 September 2013.

good storry...no doubt knowledge is power..kudos!!!!1

Posted by Martine at 12.15pm on Monday, 9 September 2013.

This is really a good read.
all the best.

Posted by Cleo at 12.26pm on Monday, 9 September 2013.

You are definitely passionate about education and its funding. A very eye-opening read. Thanks for the info. All the best.

Posted by Lisa Beardmore at 2.50pm on Monday, 9 September 2013.

Nice to see passion in one's writing. Good luck!

Posted by yvonne orio at 4.21pm on Monday, 9 September 2013.

yeah we all believe education is everythng...which aint a lie....thats nice harun....keep it going!!

Posted by Ruth Odhiambo at 6.00am on Wednesday, 11 September 2013.

Wow! What a well researched article. This is so informative and up to the standard educational article. Well done.

Posted by pearl nongauza at 10.05am on Wednesday, 11 September 2013.

This is too inspirational...that is just what the youth needs...keep the good work up

Posted by Virginia Ngare at 11.26am on Wednesday, 11 September 2013.

Keep going and don't stop. The sky is the limit!

Posted by Duncan Maina at 11.59am on Thursday, 12 September 2013.

Amazing stuff!!!! keep doing this!

Posted by Allan Muteti at 1.29pm on Thursday, 12 September 2013.

Harun this article is as informative as I had anticipated! Bravo and keep practicing.

Posted by Esther wahura at 2.24pm on Thursday, 12 September 2013.

Awwwww!!!!!! Bravo! Bravo! Bravo!.This Is so awesome Harun.Am so proud you.

Posted by Kathryn at 3.44pm on Thursday, 12 September 2013.


The fact that you are doing something about what you are passionate for,...encourages me. Am proud of you,...

Posted by Ann Mwangi at 5.19pm on Thursday, 12 September 2013.

What?! Harun, thats awesome. i love your article dia. Its not only an article but an inspiring message worldwide. Tell them Harun. we all need that. Keep Up!

Posted by Agarther Gichaga at 7.52am on Friday, 13 September 2013.

I love the article,..quit inspiring...may your message touch many souls and be the key of realization to many,.keep up,.God Bless.

Posted by sheila esendi at 11.52am on Saturday, 14 September 2013.

Wow! That Shows how creative you are.Keep the ball rolling and you will see of how many people you are going to help. THAT'S GREAT!!!

Posted by deedax sau at 4.10pm on Saturday, 14 September 2013.

wow! thats a nyc article Harun its true education is to b embraced

Posted by Haroun Risa at 5.18pm on Saturday, 14 September 2013.

Wow! Very informative and very interesting, too!

Posted by Caroline Munywoki at 6.33pm on Monday, 16 September 2013.

I like the fact about Youth being given practical knowledge and skills for future growth. Good Job Harun. So proud to see how far you have come.
Keep it up.

Posted by Neema Nkatha at 9.20pm on Monday, 16 September 2013.

A well researched and written article. Great job Harun!
In addition, emphasise on the importance of 'street' education. For instance, in the world of business, there is a lot that one learns in the streets (through experience) that is not taught in schools. School education is important as it sets the foundation but it's no good if one cannot apply or rather be smart street wise. Some of the world's leading billionaires, entrepreneures, investors etc had meagre school knowledge but invested greatly in gaining experience in the open world.
I do not think street education is emphasised enough and that is why the few who know its value tend to be more successful in life

Posted by Joyce muthoni at 12.27pm on Tuesday, 17 September 2013.

Well written and extrapolated.

Posted by nyokabi karanja at 8.27pm on Tuesday, 17 September 2013.

This is a masterpiece.

Posted by Benjamin at 5.11am on Wednesday, 18 September 2013.

Nice one bro.....! In life we are all lerning.

Posted by Eric Muthuri at 8.10am on Wednesday, 18 September 2013.

That is good work.
Sure enough an investment in knowledge pays the best interest.

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 3.30pm on Thursday, 19 September 2013.

-Thanks a lot everyone for your amazing contributions!

-Neema Nkatha,

I find your insight very engaging. Your question was taken care of by the inspirational background of the article. The Microsoft Youth Spark Program, IBM Ignite Camps and others mentioned do give training to develop ideas that encircle what includes entrepreneurship, leadership and personal development.
I must agree that ‘street education’ is an aspect that has been left out as much as we are concentrating on studying medicine, working Big Data, creating 3D printers and successfully putting an interstellar probe in space that got out of the solar system 35 years later.
We miss out on giving our youth that priceless knowledge they cannot get in class so that they can be successful in case job markets are too impervious or unrewarding. I have been reading Donald Trump’s ‘Think Like a Billionaire’ and Richard Branson’s ‘Like a Virgin’ for the past two weeks. Donald has his ways of getting things done. Surprisingly, he doesn’t much depend on technology (doesn’t use ATM cards and neither does he have a computer on his desk, according to the book.) He mentored my mentor, Liza Wisner who was top 3 in NBC’s season 10 ‘The Apprentice and she`s now a successful business performance advisor at insperity.com…an exemplar example of ‘street education.’
On to Richard, on page 71 of the book, he contrasts his and the late Steve Job`s managerial ways. What I can say is that there is no particular lesson to give to people on how to become rich. Having life mentors helps us nurture talent in a long term engagement. For instance, two writer friends of mine are under mentorship of a Caine Prize-nominated writer. Donald Trump got practical street education from his dad; from negotiating deals, choosing best sites, dealing with politics that affect real estate and so on. All the same, we have to consider the ratio of billionaires to the total population of the planet. Funding higher education is thus equally important as noted below:
'Find your talent early, get your education, create a career and serve your community.'

Usher Raymond IV, at the President's Circle Awards 2013

‘Nurture your ideas. They’re like seeds. If you provide them with proper nourishment, they’ll grow.’

Angellic, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)


Posted by Ndaiga Ngatia at 7.09am on Friday, 20 September 2013.

This is a very good piece to read. Harun has a great way of illustrating facts and passing on collaborative opinions. He`ll definitely make it big in literary and professional writing. Good work

Posted by ZoFem at 5.19pm on Friday, 20 September 2013.

Great work!
This will definitely create a huge impact in the lives of many

Posted by Margaret maina at 12.15pm on Saturday, 21 September 2013.

Great work Harun and from that article I think its now clear we should all be drinking from the fountain of knowledge of which we acquire from education which is the key to any door in life. Keep up.

Posted by Emma Gitonga at 4.39pm on Sunday, 22 September 2013.

A very positive mind-bloggling read. Keep up the good work.

Posted by Grace at 4.16pm on Friday, 27 September 2013.

good read.

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 6.26pm on Friday, 27 September 2013.

-Ndaiga, thank you a lot, the collaborative style, allusion, literary aesthetics be precise add the inspiration that I wish to instill. Like author Jonathan Swift In 1720 said a good style is characterized by “proper words in proper places.” I try my best to make my audience get the best. It is all about making a difference and being aware of the difference between healthy pride and destructive ego.

-Margaret, you are right, makes me think of what I recently read in the Education For All Global (EFA) Monitoring Report (2012):

‘…education is not only about making sure children can attend school. It is about setting young people up life, by giving them opportunities to find decent work, earn a living, contribute to their communities and societies, and fulfill their potential…’
That really shows the importance of education.
-Irine Bokova,
Director-General, UNESCO

-ZoFem, I really feel honored. Keep doing the good work changing lives through your organization Women For A Change Cameroon (WFAC).

-Emma, thanks a lot for the encouragement. It gives me the incentive to go an extra mile in doing what I love.

Posted by Wanja Shiro at 8.50am on Wednesday, 2 October 2013.

That last part is my greatest take out. Took him what 13yrs!!! Iit sure is quite a dynamic life and costs us alot of sacrifice and patience however we sure need to do something about boosting our countries` Education platter in terms of both accessibility and Relevance i would add.
Harun this is a pretty piece. Needs to reach them that are in positions

Posted by Abdulkarim Said at 1.51pm on Wednesday, 2 October 2013.

Good Job Bro!

Posted by Sheila Ndinda at 2.31pm on Wednesday, 2 October 2013.

This is a good read..Education is an important key in life.

Posted by maureen scott at 3.45pm on Wednesday, 2 October 2013.

Digital learning is critical to the future. Kenya already leads the world in mobile banking, why not lead the world in digital publishing!
Maureen

Posted by GRace at 3.45pm on Wednesday, 2 October 2013.

Very insightful

Posted by Hellen Odumbe at 1.24am on Thursday, 3 October 2013.

Very insightful indeed. Harun i honestly did not imagine that you were this versed with knowledge. Pretty good stuff coming your way..keep it up

Posted by Queen Otieno at 7.54am on Thursday, 3 October 2013.

Wow great thought Harun without Education i wonder where i would be right now. Education is the key to life and we should all embrace it to have a good future . Keep it up my dear

Posted by Hooman Samani at 11.18am on Thursday, 3 October 2013.

Great work by Harun. I happily support his effort.

Posted by Grace Kagwa at 4.59pm on Thursday, 3 October 2013.

Wow very nice article!!!!!!!!! keep up the good work..

Posted by Evalyne at 5.01pm on Thursday, 3 October 2013.

nyc article Harun,keep it up.indeed education is tha key to everything

Posted by Dennis at 5.05pm on Thursday, 3 October 2013.

Good work! our nation require people with such mind Harun, lets endeavor to see our nation enlightened.

Posted by Eric Njagi at 5.11pm on Thursday, 3 October 2013.

Good content is very difficult to produce and hard to maintain, and it’s way too valuable to die..
damn hard work.

Posted by kennedy nange at 5.58am on Friday, 4 October 2013.

Nice article Harun....I love the content. Kudos!!

Posted by Kelvin Kamau at 3.21pm on Friday, 4 October 2013.

This is amazing....a real eye opener..Keep it up Harun.

Posted by Daniel Nyairo at 3.40am on Saturday, 5 October 2013.

Informative and challenging piece

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 6.56am on Monday, 7 October 2013.

Thank you everyone for the contributions. Education really matters and that is why it should be funded.

'Education is simply the soul of a society as it passes from one generation to another.' (G. K. Chesterson)

Posted by Obed Muindi Simiyu at 3.30pm on Tuesday, 8 October 2013.

".....Educating our youth is more worthy than other forms of investment....." I wouldn't agree more. Nice piece there Harun.

Posted by purity kimani at 8.25am on Monday, 21 October 2013.

CONGRATS,Thats soo wise of you,its soo inspiring and we hope to more open minded people lyk yu.

Posted by Kitoo at 3.23pm on Monday, 21 October 2013.

The strength lies not in your investment but the power of your dreams. Indeed. Good article

Posted by Charity at 8.09am on Tuesday, 22 October 2013.

Very informative blog....wonderful words of encouragement...

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 8.49pm on Saturday, 26 October 2013.

Thanks for your contribution guys! I would like to ask a question... What if you're given support in terms of funds yet there's no interest in you to learn... Maybe because of depression or let downs making you feel insecure, what's the best way to deal with it? Many higher institution students are experiencing this because of several issues which may lead to dropping out of school or losing the incentive to go an extra mile to achieve their dreams. Whether it is psychological evaluation, giving examples (personal experiences) or any general solution all contributions are welcome!

Posted by Tina Alma at 5.26pm on Monday, 28 October 2013.

Very informative and educative article. Keep up the good work Harun.

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 8.40pm on Tuesday, 29 October 2013.

Thank you for reading Tina

Posted by Lorena Wayne at 5.24am on Sunday, 3 November 2013.

very good read harun. That was amazingly well researched and articulate.

Posted by ceerh waithira at 7.08am on Sunday, 3 November 2013.

vry informative..i admire your style of writing.good work

Posted by Brennen Matthews at 1.35pm on Monday, 4 November 2013.

Very interesting read. Certainly a topic that the writer is well versed in.

Posted by irene muthoni at 2.35pm on Monday, 4 November 2013.

nice article harun. about your question, there are many channels that the students can use to voice their challenges.if there are not any at specified universities, the administration can always form some which are led by elected student leaders. that can be one solution.

Posted by Diane at 2.50pm on Monday, 4 November 2013.

very interesting article....I've learnt a lot. Keep it!

Posted by Collins Okoth at 2.53pm on Monday, 4 November 2013.

Very wonderful article. I am impressed by your thoughts keep doing that.

Posted by at 12.55pm on Wednesday, 6 November 2013.

nice and well researched work.kudos!Continue giving us these very educative articles.

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 2.08pm on Thursday, 7 November 2013.



Thank you for your contributions. Irene, just to add on, despite the importance of funding education is vital so that gender mainstreaming comes in. This year's CNN Top 10 Heroes nomination list includes Kakenya Ntaiya, who is a 'trailblazer for women's education in Kenya.' She is a National Geographic Emerging explorer. She was born in a Maasai community where girls of the age 12 are ready for marriage. However, she insisted on education and became the first woman in her community to attend university in the US. Today she sponsors over 150 girls ranging from 4th to 8th grade. The uniqueness comes in where she had to negotiate with her father in order not to get married. So, as per my question, in order to address the various personal issues affecting our youth, leading to under-performance or dropping out of school, I suggest that role models be selected by the particular higher learning institutions and engage the students in effective life skill tutelage sessions. This will help them cope with the stress hence carry on with their education.

Here is more of her story: http://goo.gl/O7g2h9

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 2.08pm on Thursday, 7 November 2013.



Thank you for your contributions. Irene, just to add on, despite the importance of funding education is vital so that gender mainstreaming comes in. This year's CNN Top 10 Heroes nomination list includes Kakenya Ntaiya, who is a 'trailblazer for women's education in Kenya.' She is a National Geographic Emerging explorer. She was born in a Maasai community where girls of the age 12 are ready for marriage. However, she insisted on education and became the first woman in her community to attend university in the US. Today she sponsors over 150 girls ranging from 4th to 8th grade. The uniqueness comes in where she had to negotiate with her father in order not to get married. So, as per my question, in order to address the various personal issues affecting our youth, leading to underperformance or dropping out of school, I suggest that role models be selected by the particular higher learning institutions and engage the students in effective life skill tutelage sessions. This will help them cope with the stress hence carry on with their education.

Here is more of her story: www.goo.gl/O7g2h9

Posted by Dickson njoroge at 10.54am on Thursday, 14 November 2013.

Harun bravo its true education is the key to succcess keep the fire burninig

Posted by Grace wangui at 12.57pm on Saturday, 16 November 2013.

Nice work i was impressed all the way through by the passion you showed in your article keep it up i totally agree that higher education should be funded even if their is no enough money. We should sacrifice for a better tomorrow

Posted by Alex Matu at 5.52pm on Wednesday, 27 November 2013.

"To get a good job I need college education. To get a good college education I need money. To earn money I need a job." A frustrated colleague updated this on his Facebook timeline recently. A perspective I found very real for him; he faced expulsion from the examination room for fees arrears. The Higher education loan program in my country has helped just as many students as it's turned down. The ratio could be higher, but those who get considered pay up the loans on lenient-interest terms. On the other hand i.e America's program, seems to bear down on job market entrants with the high interest loans. Higher education is "necessarily" expensive, and though in different ways, for both systems. I urge stakeholders to hasten reform. I also urge the youth to take advantage of our information age and SELF EDUCATE. Good work Harun!

Posted by alex at 9.50am on Monday, 2 December 2013.

excellent

Posted by JUNE NJOROGE at 10.11am on Monday, 2 December 2013.

Very informative and insightful I daresay but certainly very true;education is the backbone of any economy.Good work.

Posted by at 8.56am on Wednesday, 4 December 2013.

awesome article Harun !!
very insightful

Posted by at 9.01am on Wednesday, 4 December 2013.

Knowledge is power! I am very impressed!

Posted by cherono at 9.03am on Wednesday, 4 December 2013.

Knowledge is power! I am very impressed!

Posted by Marion Wakasa at 9.25am on Wednesday, 4 December 2013.

Very intresting article,it gives great insight on the importance of naturing knowledge.

Posted by Aggie Karua at 10.07am on Wednesday, 4 December 2013.

A good one! And if i may reecho Nelson Mandela:Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.

Posted by eunita maingi at 10.21am on Wednesday, 4 December 2013.

good article..all the support..

Posted by Patricia Maina at 11.09am on Wednesday, 4 December 2013.

this is a great article Harun and informative as well, kudos

Posted by lydia at 11.41am on Wednesday, 4 December 2013.

Wow this is awesome!! if only we had many bright and inspirational people in our country as you, surely we would be so far. keep up n congrats

Posted by Loana Munupe at 12.07pm on Wednesday, 4 December 2013.

That was an awesome article...worth reading..me love it!!!!

Posted by alice at 4.15pm on Wednesday, 4 December 2013.

this is beautiful.....an inspiration//.......loving it!!!!!!

Posted by faith. N. M. at 5.06pm on Wednesday, 4 December 2013.

I love the topic and how you tackled all areas. It's very knowledgeable and true. You the best! Keep up with the fire.....

Posted by Harun Momanyi at 1.13pm on Tuesday, 10 December 2013.

Thanks everyone for your contributions!

-Aggie, I truly agree..."Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." that's a very encouraging and inspiring quote from the late Nelson Mandela. He left an amazing legacy for all of us to embrace.
-Loana, I am humbled!
-Lydia, words cannot express my gratitude that you took your time to read and found the piece helpful.
-Faith, I appreciate the fact that you read and learned something from it!

Last evening, I had read through CIO East Africa Magazine 2012 Dec/Jan Issue and I came across a tech leader's take on the education situation in our country.
"In some of the countries, it is not very easy to find talent because of education; especially technology education is not as good as Kenya or South Africa. So we have to get Chinese people to work here."
-Li Dafeng, regional president of Huawei East and Southern Africa. The investors coming to operate in Africa find it hard to spot potential employees who are trained in the fields relevant to available jobs. This causes unemployment to rise in the particular countries.
This really shows that education is not only a pivot to gaining self development but also a chance to work with people from different cultures and backgrounds from allover the world.
If you need support, here are some of the institutions/organizations that offer support for higher education, through subsidized funding or free and scholarships include saylor.org, University of the People, Agha Khan Development Network, Gambia Education Support Organization. Charity Village, International Working Group on Education (IWGE) and FHI360.

Posted by Valentyne Mwanaisha at 4.38am on Wednesday, 11 December 2013.

Nice one Harun!!! You have killed it.

Posted by Esther at 7.21am on Friday, 20 December 2013.

Great article,i totally agree that our education system should be directed on moulding enterpreneurs to solve this issue of unemployment.

Posted by Michelle Mutethia at 8.22am on Sunday, 12 January 2014.

This is a very exquisite piece of work. I find it involving and good to read. It's as well as knowledgeable on issues pertaining employment and all its forms of admissions. Very impressive.

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